Places to try/avoid?

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From what I've heard, they usually throw out books with labeling.

 

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So i'm just curious where people have had the best luck or worst luck even in different places?

Places i'm avoiding are the bus stations (since the 1st and only time I left 1 very clearly labelled book, it got picked up and treated like a security threat and labelled for destruction - I only know that much as I saw it getting taken away by the security and I popped in the next day and checked if it was there, and it was thankfully, but labelled saying it would be destroyed in 2 months) :(

Best places I've had luck are at the local Bookcrossing meetup here, the Princes Street Gardens, and at a few local monuments. But I've got a LOT of available titles ready and no idea where else to release :/

Any ideas? :)

 

Have you tried releasing at an OBCZ? The Go Hunting page for Edinburgh lists three OBCZs and two of them have had recent activity (Hemma and Canongate Books). I don't know if the catch rate is any higher than a wild release somewhere in town but at least you know your releases won't be considered a security threat!

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/743329
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/487731

PS I've just realised that Hemma may actually be the location for the Meetups so you probably already know about it!

 

yeah Hemma is the locals for me :)

 

wingMoemwing 5 yrs ago
RE: OBCZs?
I don't know if the catch rate is any higher than a wild release somewhere in town

In my experience: no, it's way lower.

 

That's too tempting for someone to just pick the book up and drop it in the bin.

 

It seems to vary by locality, but in general I've had my best luck with releases in ATM booths and at museums. Themed releases sometimes seem to do better than average too, at least if it's a fairly obvious theme - one of my best multi-hop releases was this one:

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12169025/

I like to mix up my release locations, making use of Little Free Libraries, OBCZs, and non-BC-related book-swap shelves as well as random outdoor locations on park benches, statues, and other scenic spots. I've had catches from all of these, though never as many as I'd like {wry grin}.

Re the bus stations: that's one of many "it depends" location-types. In my area, there are some bus and subway stations that have book-swap shelves of their own, so of course I leave books there when I can. I do refrain from leaving books in places with clear security concerns, whether explicitly posted (as in most US airports) or due to specific incidents (after the bombing at the Boston Marathon two years ago I limited my Boston releases to book-swap shelves for quite some time). And some places - national parks, for example - have clear policies against leaving things lying around, so I wouldn't release books there either. But there are often alternatives: parking lots or waiting areas with benches, places where books can be examined at leisure and are not in the way...

Sometimes I've taken advantage of other BCers, sending boxes of my books to them for release at festivals, special events, or their own OBCZs. But mostly I like to look for photogenic spots in which to leave my books, in hopes that I'll tempt some finders into becoming BCers themselves!

 

they just put the books in the bin. same for cafe nerros and most cafes.

 

and some of them like us to release books there. Best to ask a manager if it's okay to leave them as some are receptive and some definitely not.

 

cafes

I always ask the owner if it's okay before I leave a book in a cafe. I have never had a refusal.

 

I have never had a refusal.


Years ago I was told at a Starbucks where we had a BookCrossing MeetUp that they would definitely throw out any books we left behind. Needless to say, we never went back.

But, as I said, other Starbucks locations have been fine with releases being left there.

 

if i could find a manager in some of them it would be amazing, really couldn't be bothered doing that

there are better places to go than starbucks although as solittletime says some starbucks are nicer than others

 

I prepae at home Books in releasebags than I take my bike an with some thread I am hanging the book along ways were people use to go for a walk. I am hanging the release bags right ut to the level of my eyes. This year ester I released 17 Books in this way and up to now I have got journal entres from 50% of the books. Try it! its working!

 

i'm finding that leaning a book up against the back of a bench as if it's sitting on a bench is really working

had a wild release caught! :-) feel really happy

saw someone else with a book i'd left and she seemed to be online on her phone - expected to have that wild release caught too, but no result. maybe because i'd left a lukewarm journal entry on the book (and also corrected the spelling mistakes in the book) i'd put that particular person off....

 

wingMoemwing 5 yrs ago
RE: benches
maybe because i'd left a lukewarm journal entry on the book (and also corrected the spelling mistakes in the book) i'd put that particular person off....

I doubt it. If people get far enough to see that, I think they will usually leave an entry of their own.

 

saw someone else with a book i'd left and she seemed to be online on her phone - expected to have that wild release caught too, but no result.


I've acquired a superstitious dread of watching my released books, or of looking for them if I drive by the spot - I've seen too many cases of people picking up the books, chatting excitedly about them, sometimes even mentioning BookCrossing ("I've heard of that, it's this web site where...") only to get no JEs on those books. Well, no *immediate* JEs; I've learned that many finders seem to prefer to wait until they've read a book to journal it (or perhaps they assume they're supposed to do it that way).

I do like to leave books on benches, especially those in scenic spots. If the weather's good I leave them without release-bags, so the little "I'm free" or "Traveling book" sticky-notes will flutter in the breeze and attract attention. And I do get a fair percentage of catches, so it seems to work for me.

Oh, and as for lukewarm or even negative reviews, I've had some really fun catches of books that I didn't like at all; either the finders like them anyway, or they enjoy the "traveling" idea more than the content of the book.

 

Outside the local pilot gig gym/ boat store 90% pick up rate (cawsand Cornwall)
Ticket machine in car park 100% pick up rate (3/3 got journaled) (cawsand Cornwall)
Park benches 50/50 (millbrook my home village)
Stairwell in local shopping centre 90% catch rate (Plymouth)
Outside local doctors surgery (99%) (millbrook my home village)

 

the best luck for me is when i vist nursing homes i give them books:)

 

do you get journals/catches? I've left some, and also at Senior Centers, where I'm sure they are read, but I've never had a journal from either.

 

i have placed several books in nursing homes, i have gotten no JE and most people just place them in lost and found

 

have a good success rate for me (just don't leave them too near there book selling area).

I use the gardens, as they would object if I left them in the actually property.

And the gardens are usually good if you like stealth releasing.

I have also had quite a bit of luck in Devon at Start point on the walk down to and near the lighthouse.

 

I've had quite a lot of success leaving books in a National Trust area-as you say not near their bookshop-on benches next to a lake and also in leaflet boxes along the way.

 

zbird 4 yrs ago
trash cans
When I first posted I had left a book on a trash can outside a store I was immediately told someone would just throw it in the trash can. Well, this has been far from true! I get most of my JE's from books left on the trash cans outside grocery and drug stores. I have even watched people take the books and found the entry on that book later. Don't know what the magic is but that's what works for me. I also leave books in the laundromat and have gotten a few JE's from books found there, but the trash cans seem to work best for me.

Also, I put a homemade label on the front of the book saying 'this is a traveling book. Please go to bookcrossing.com and enter BCID....... so we may track it's journey.' I used to put the label inside the book with a free book sticker on the front cover and got very few JE's. Putting the label on the front cover seems to have made a big difference.

 

I don't have a good ratio of journal for my releases. My books gets picked up for sure. I use to leave them on a bench of a park on my way to work. On the way back, the book is gone. Quick peek in the trash can to be sure and it's not there. I'm in eastern Canada,there's not a lot of bookcrossers around. For me the best is what is called here "Boîte à lire". It's been created by charity groups in a couple of cities and it's a box where you can exchange books. Most of my books goes there and I get one back. Really cool. I did not get any journal on the almost 20 books I left there but I know someone will enjoy them.

 

Hospital waiting rooms, although no catches there.
In a bank or the shelf of the ATM.
Not near any store selling new books - they really get aggravated there :o)
I've tried park benches, on top of mailboxes, benches at bus stops. I used to leave them in cafes, but you might have to lurk & watch to make sure the staff don't throw them out.
All over West Edmonton Mall, which is near here - most of my catches were other BookCrossers hunting from my release notes.
I left a mystery novel with a wedding theme outside a bridal shop. Novel set in a bakery outside a bakery; you get the idea. Not sure if the catch rate was improved but it was fun for me.
Try anything at least once - you never know!

 

I used to leave them in cafes, but you might have to lurk & watch to make sure the staff don't throw them out.

I prefer to speak to the cafe staff first and ask if it's okay to leave a book and check they won't throw it out. I have never had my request refused, although one place said only two books at most. I've had several staff catch the books themselves, although most don't bother to log them. I even had one keen waitress want all the books, telling me she loved reading and promising she would log them. However, as I like to spread the books I only gave her a couple, which was as well, as she never (surprise, surprise) logged them.

 

"One keen waitress wanted all the books - but never logged them".
Smiling. Another local BCer & I used to catch each other's books at a small shopping centre. We noticed we were too late for some books - the cleaning lady was picking them up. I explained what we were doing & she said she didn't have a computer (this was 2004) but was enjoying the books. So, still worth it even without a catch.
I don't go to coffee shops much anymore, but you are probably right to ask if it's OK to leave a book first. There is one near here with a take one/leave one shelf which might be good. I was thinking of using the supermarket too.

 

I've tried local coffee shops, gas pumps, ATMs, Park benches, rest stops on interstates....

One road trip yielded two catches and journal entries out of four releases - three were in Missouri, and I checked on the way home to see they were gone. One of those was journaled by "anonymous finder". Another book I left on a picnic table in a city park in Eureka Springs, Arkansas - a half hour later I drove by and it was gone. Several years later it was journaled after somebody bought it from a used book store in Harrison, Arkansas (maybe 75 miles away?) that coincidentally I'd bought books at on another trip to the area.

I would rather just RABCK, or meet with fellow BookCrossers to swap, or leave in an OBCZ (though I've had no journal entries from ones left at Panera Bread here in Des Moines or an Omaha coffee shop I always leave a book at whenever I visit there) or Little Free Library.

Once, when a girlfriend and I split up, apparently a box of books got left in her house. After she died in a car accident, her mother took all the books in the house and dropped them off with Planned Parenthood, and a few journal entries came out of that - one of them from Israel!

 

I've tried several spots:
- one on a table at a McDonalds
- one on a bench at a university
- several at my apartment complex club house and computer room
- a few at my work
- a few at LFL's
- one at a Rest Area off the freeway

I've hardly gotten any JE's from people who picked up the books. I got a couple of anonymous JE's saying "the book showed up in the LFL" but not from anyone who actually took and read the books. I'm pretty sad that the only JE's I've gotten from people who actually seem interested are fellow BC folks I've sent books to as part of various sweepstakes and stuff. :( Any thoughts?

 

As far as I'm concerned, there's no way to know when the right person will come by at the right time to find the right book. It's serendipity.

BookCrossing wouldn't be nearly as much fun for me if all releases got caught. It's never knowing which or where or when that makes it interesting. And exciting when one does get caught.

Of course, the more well-labeled books you release, the better chance you have. That said, you have no way to know if any books you've already released will still write home someday. If you check the Site Watch Forum, you'll see that more often than not, they take a while to get journaled. Mine are usually after I've given up on hearing from them again.

Good luck. I hope you get some JEs soon.

 

How are you labelling the books?
I have a main label inside the cover, a smaller one on the cover, a spine label (this one is very important, so as to show up in second-hand bookshops), and a label at the end of the story showing bookcrossing.com and it's BCID number, with a request we would like to hear from the book again. I have just under 1 in 3 books caught and logged, although sometimes that's after months/years.

 

I've been putting a label inside, and a sticky note on the front of the book saying "I'm a traveling book, please use my BCID code number inside to log my adventures on bookcrossing.com, (anonymously if you wish), then read and release me so I can travel on."

 

I've been putting a label inside, and a sticky note on the front of the book saying "I'm a traveling book, please use my BCID code number inside to log my adventures on bookcrossing.com, (anonymously if you wish), then read and release me so I can travel on."


I don't use sticky notes myself, I find they fall off easily. Although many people here do use them I guess. My labels are all covered with clear packing tape.

 

Yes, I tape my labels on the inside but the sticky notes on the front are just for attention so that people don't think the book is lost or abandoned, etc.

 

I've been putting a label inside, and a sticky note on the front of the book saying "I'm a traveling book, please use my BCID code number inside to log my adventures on bookcrossing.com, (anonymously if you wish), then read and release me so I can travel on."

Sticky labels fall off, so I don't use them. They are fine to use though as an extra, a long as you also have a securely attached label on the cover. And please, a spine label, which may need to be taped on, as many times the spine label doesn't stick well. For those of us who scan the books in second-hand shops (which usually means the spines), looking for BC books, it's the only way we will notice them, by those spine labels. I have found several BC books because of their spine label. But I often wonder how many BC books I saw, but didn't recognise, because there was no spine label. They might still be sitting on the book shelf, even years later. I also put a label with the BCID number, etc, inside, on the last page, under the last paragraph of the story.
Some people also write 'Bookcrossing. com' plus 'BCID:_________' on the page edges of the book. I do sometimes, but not always.

 

Hmmm I haven't done that but I think I might start. Thanks for the info. I just started Book Crossing a few months ago.

 

Hmmm I haven't done that but I think I might start. Thanks for the info. I just started Book Crossing a few months ago.


The Tiny Labels in the Supply Store are pretty cheap and great for spine labels (as long as they are covered with clear packing tape as they pop off).

 

Re spine labels-I always add one and stick selotape over the top of it to stop it falling off. If another bookcrosser identifies your book from the spine label in a second hand bookshop they can always just make a note of the BCID number if they don't want to actually buy the book. Then they can at least make a journal entry to say when and where they found the book to let the person know who registered it.
I have only ever found one book in the wild and it was in a charity shop. I did buy it but I didn't like it! It didn't have a spine label -it was just luck that I happened to pick up that book to check on the price.

 

spine labels

I have been checking second hand book shops on my UK travels by looking for those spine labels. Did that today. I have three books with me to read at present, so I didn't look at the books with buying in mind, unless I spotted one of those labels. I didn't remove the books from the shelf, so only the spine label would identify a BC book for me.

 

khonsus 3 yrs ago
For me
I tend to randomly release at random times. I keep a bag of already prepped books in the trunk of my car so that I can release when the urge strikes. I used to leave books in restaurants on chairs, in the entrance way waiting area or the bathrooms. Problem is most of those books sadly ended up being collected by the people working there and promptly dumped behind their counters where all missing items seem to end up. I no longer leave them in such places.

About two years ago I started releasing in local parks and state parks, much better chances of being claimed there and even had two feedbacks on books I left in a local park and a military park so that was nice. I also tend to leave a lot in one of the state parks near my house and nine times out of ten they end up disappearing within a day.

I've also tried campground bathrooms and they always disappear though no one usually leaves a post about them.

Other places I've tried rest stops along highways, a few to a local donation place, a few in random locations scattered throughout my local area.

It's really a game of chance. Now finding books? I've only ever found two and both of those I found in a paperback trade store and how I spotted them? One had the label on the spine. The other one had the label on the front cover. As someone else mentioned try to include spine labels because otherwise they are nearly impossible to locate in such places as paperback trades and thrift stores where some often end up being caught.

As for labeling? I used to just label the inside cover but now I put a label on the spine, a small sticker on the front cover or back cover stating it's a free book and to please take and a note on the inside cover. I also write the BCID number on the inside back cover and at the very end of the book where the story itself ends because I figure if someone reads it and gets to the end then sees the little notation they may be more likely to leave a note here. Someone in one of these forums mentioned they do the same thing so that it catches those who collect books to read at a later date. It might "prompt" them to post here.

I don't know. All I can say is best of luck and try not to get too discouraged if you don't get feedbacks. Otherwise have fun with it! :)

 

I like putting them in bathrooms of public places or park benches, ferrys,

Instead of using sticky notes like i saw u guys were talking about, i use sharpies or packing tape over the sticker... just a tip! :)

 

I don't know I had an aunt in a nursing home/ rehabilitation center several times last year and each floor she was on had loads of bookshelves with reading materials for residents. All of which was donated to them from local library discards as well as from individuals.

That aunt started collecting books to donate to them afyer her second stay there. I slipped a few books onto the shelves, no journal entries from them but I'm pretty sure they are being read.

 

Readermax 3 yrs ago
Hotels
Although I haven't released a book yet, I might try to release in a hotel soon. I think leaving it in the lounge area of a hotel might be a good idea. If there ae chairs next to the concierge's desk, you can leave it there: someone who is bored in the line to speak with the concierge is likely to pick it up. Another good thing about releasing in hotels is that your books will probably travel very far, since people might take the book back to their hometown.
I hope this helps! :)

 

Although I haven't released a book yet, I might try to release in a hotel soon. I think leaving it in the lounge area of a hotel might be a good idea. If there ae chairs next to the concierge's desk, you can leave it there: someone who is bored in the line to speak with the concierge is likely to pick it up. Another good thing about releasing in hotels is that your books will probably travel very far, since people might take the book back to their hometown.
I hope this helps! :)

I would always ask the hotel staff if this is okay first. The same with cafes and the like. I have never had a no yet, but it could happen. Also it's good if the staff know what the book is about, or they might throw it out.

 

When I was traveling in Australia a couple of years ago I left a fair few books on the youth hostels book exchange Shelfs because it was just extra baggage weight, some where rather quick catches, others not so much

 

From what I've heard, they usually throw out books with labeling.

 

From what I've heard, they usually throw out books with labeling.


It does depend on the shop - some do, some don't. Might be worth asking the manager - though of course there are lots of other places to leave books. [Many park-bench releases may wind up in secondhand or thrift shops anyway, of course; some of mine have turned up that way - complete with labels, which is how I knew they were mine!]

 

From what I've heard, they usually throw out books with labeling.

I have found BC books in secondhand shops, but it does depend on the shop. I walk along the shelves scanning for the BC spine label. One shop I went into I mentioned that I was looking for BC labels, and then explained BC. The owner pulled a labelled BC book out from under the counter. He was about to take off the labels, and he said he always did. After I explained BC to him, he said he wouldn't from now on. Sceptic as I am I didn't believe him, but I smiled. He was telling the truth though, or although I didn't buy the book - it was in German - I did take the BC number and log it as seen and say where the book was. Some months later the book was logged in another city, so the book shop owner was telling the truth. He didn't remove the labels...at least for this book.

 

From what I've heard, they usually throw out books with labeling.


As the others have said, it depends on the shop. I've found BookCrossing books at the local Goodwill and Salvation Army stores, as well as a used bookstore I go to a lot. I don't know if others have been thrown out or not, but at least some are making it to the shelves for sale.

 

I don't release in those anyway. I want my books to go to someone who is getting them for free, not someone who was already buying books. I just think it's more fun this way: there's at least a bit of a surprise involved.

 

Actually I've never released in them either, but my books have ended up there, after I've released them elsewhere.

 

A few times I've found some World book night books that were BC marked and the people behind the counter said they were going to the incinerator to be destroyed. I ended up saving them

 

The first book I found went missing after I left it in the departure lounge in Brussels. No more entries even 2 years later.
I'm not risking any train stations now.

 

It might have been picked up by a reader, but not logged. Only about 10 to 25 percent of picked up books are ever logged. I believe the odds are influenced by where the book is left and how it is labelled. However, in some places, such as maybe Eurostar terminals and airports there might be a security issue with leaving books, and how zealot the cleaners are.

 

They'll just get chucked away as labelled books are deemed unworthy to sell

 

Depends on the shop. I have found (and bought) a labelled book from a charity shop.

 

I have found (and bought) a labelled book from a charity shop.


Me too. I've found (and bought) many in various charity shops for different causes.

 

A lot of charity shops near me such as ST Luke's, oxfam, and cancer research , always chuck BC labelled books away, as they are deemed as "spoilt and unreadable"

The only time I've found a properly labelled BC book in a charity shop is when that charity shop is one for a community project and is not a country/world wide one

 

 

Yes, often books in the more remote places are the books that get journalled. I have had similar experiences.

 

My gut reaction is to avoid any place that has regular cleaners - stores, restaurants and coffee shops, malls, etc., unless they have a book trading shelf set up. I'm sure books do get picked up from places like that sometimes, but if they don't, it seems like it's just an easy way for them to get labeled as litter and thrown out by employees.

 

This just came up recently in one of the hiking forums I frequent and so I wanted to pass it along here. Resist the temptation to release books when hiking along trails with a shelter or hut system. Apparently, mice and certain other vermin that the shelter maintainers would rather not take up permanent residence, like to shred the books for nesting material and move in all cozy like when books are left. The shelter maintainers informed us booksie hikers that the catch rate for books left is smaller than 1 in 10 and to please "pack it in, pack it out".

 

That's a shame - understandable, but a shame! I don't know if it applies to all shelters, though; I think some of the ones in New Hampshire's White Mountains have bookshelves of their own. But perhaps they clear them out before shutting the huts for the winter?

The shelter maintainers informed us booksie hikers that the catch rate for books left is smaller than 1 in 10


That's... actually not that bad, compared to catch-rates from all other kinds of releases {wry grin}.

 

the catch rate for books left is smaller than 1 in 10


I think that's higher than my catch rate for wild releases.

 

I like sharing shelves such as at the laundromat, campground community rooms, hospitals- places where people are naturally interested in finding a book.
Little Libraries or Friends of the Library also.
I have a fear of wild releases being treated as litter and dumped in the trash.

 

I have a fear of wild releases being treated as litter and dumped in the trash.

But they usually get the most logs.

 

I go through periods of trading, but postage from NZ is fairly expensive.
Most of my releases are Wild.
Yha have the best catch rates.
Interesting, have released more at Top 10 parks (Top10.co.nz) & no catches. Have been back to the same parks, within 18 months & the books have gone.
Samexwith LFL & Bookfridges.
Still prefer the truelly Wild Releases, with its low catch rate. Most books are cheap/free, but dont mind buying from an OP Shop.

 

Yha have the best catch rates.

My favourite (actually only one I think) YHA release, was this themed one; left in the freezer of the shared refrigerator in a Melbourne YHA. Rather like the serial killer - the iceman - left his victims.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12410402/

 

Trees are apparently effective for wild releases: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9265756

 

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